Presentation: Overview of University of Hawai‘i Economic Research Organization fire projects

Dr. Kim Burnett, Assistant Director of the University of Hawai`i Economic Research Organization presents some of her economic analysis of Hawaiian dry forest restoration as well as wildfire-related work in the aftermath of the August 2023 Maui fires.

Presentation: Challenges to Rapid Wildfire Containment in Hawai‘i

Dr. Lisa Gollin is an applied anthropologist and social scientist who presented her findings from interviews she conducted as part of the project “Challenges to Rapid Wildfire Containment in Hawaii”.

Pacific Island Wildfire Data

Hawai‘i Wildfire Management Organization, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and partners are tracking Hawai‘i records for ignitions, the extent and perimeters of areas burned.

Today’s Fire Challenges in Hawaiʻi

Since the arrival of European and American settlers in the late 18th century, the cultural and economic landscape of Hawaiʻi has undergone rapid and profound transformations.

Colonization (18 C. to present) Radically Transforms the Landscape to Include Fire

Since the arrival of European and American settlers in the late 18th century, the cultural and economic landscape of Hawaiʻi has undergone rapid and profound transformations.

When re-vegetating, reduce the spread of invasive species.

When re-planting, limit the spread of invasive pests by following these guidelines.

After fire, first things first.

In the aftermath of evacuation and recovery, communities and responders are often dealing with hazardous environmental conditions which call for vigillant public safety and environmental stabilization.

For long-term wildfire risk mitigation planning, supporting agriculture and reducing fuels around your home and community are key.

The role that farms and ranches play in land care is critical across fire prone landscapes. Ranches and farms keep fire-prone weeds at bay to maintain pastures and crops.

What is your emergency soil stabilization plan? This can be done in various high-tech and low-tech ways.

After human health and safety, the first priority is to protect the soils from rain and run-off.

Consider re-vegetating burned areas in a way that makes sense for your environment while knowing that resources (time, money, long-term stewardship) may vary.

Re-planting is an important, long-term strategy for soil stabilization. While native Hawaiian plants are always desirable, they require a great deal of care, such as water, fencing and weeding.

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